Nudie Jeans turns Recycled Jeans Into Furniture and Rugs

Nudie Jeans turns Recycled Jeans Into Furniture and Rugs

All image credits to Nudie Jeans

Nudie Jeans turns Recycled Jeans Into Furniture and Rugs

I love posting about the big brands, and the small brands, and everything in between…but one thing I always am attracted to is sustainable fashion. As popular as the style industry is, it’s refreshing to see the occasional earth-friendly initiative pop up, and it’s becoming not so “occasional” as time goes on. Nudie jeans, best known as one of the top brands for incredible raw denim, also has their own program to reduce their footprint: the Recycle Denim Maniacs Project, which collects and recycled old worn out Nudie jeans. This time around, they are recycling approximately 2,700 pairs of jeans into their popular Rag Rug from a past recycling project and the In-and-Out Seam Camper Seat, in two colors. Due to the complexity of a pair of jeans, not all are entirely recyclable. According to Nudie, “back pockets, rivets and buttons, waistband, were components that we couldn’t use for these two projects. But they’ll be used somewhere else, for another project.” This time around for their initiative, 90% of the pairs of denim they received were able to be recycled.

Nudie Jeans turns Recycled Jeans Into Furniture and Rugs

WE BELIEVE that the right way to go is to reduce, reuse and recycle. We wanted to visualise our passion for the Nudie Jeans denim and to make a statement for a sustainable future. That’s why we lead a creative project to recycle old denim samples into new creations made by young designers.”

Nudie Jeans turns Recycled Jeans Into Furniture and Rugs - Lill Matt

Each In-and-Out Seam Camper Seat camper seat is made from the inner and outer seams from nine pairs of jeans, one belt and a leather patch. They are inspired by the popularity of camping in Sweden! The Rag Rugs are constructed with all the remaining parts. Each seat is braided by hand, and only 250 are available for purchase. They come in either dark blue or light blue, and measure 45 cm high, 40cm wide, and have a 39.5cm depth. Each of the Rag Rugs are made from shredded leg pieces of all the recycled Nudie jeans, in two sizes. The Lill-Mats are 140 x 70 centimeters, with a limited quantity of 275. The Stor-Mats are 240 x 170 centimeters and there’s only 75 of them made!

Nudie Jeans turns Recycled Jeans Into Furniture and Rugs - Stor-Mats

I love repurposed stuff, and I wish I had a little more time to do this kind of stuff on my own! I have a few denim scraps lying around, but I like to keep them for any possible repair needs. These pieces are so artistic I’d be afraid to use them! I wonder how fast these are going to sell out, seeing as how they are highly limited, but it will be exciting to see what Nudie’s Recycle Denim Maniacs Project comes up with next. For now, I’d love one of those rugs and the light blue camping chair! Out of the hundreds of jeans I’ve been able to own or try out, Nudie is one of the brands I haven’t had a chance to yet. I’ve heard nothing but great things about them though, and this only makes them stand out even more in my eyes!

Nudie Jeans turns Recycled Jeans Into Furniture and Rugs - Camper Seat Light Blue

Camper Seat Light Blue

Read more about this recycled collection by Nudie and shop it here.

Key Art by La Clé Jewelry

Key Art by La Clé Jewelry

Key Art by La Clé Jewelry

The key is a symbolic icon…with tattoos it might signify opening up to a person through trust (at least that’s what I was thinking when I considered getting one), or something forbidden and mysterious. I also think of security, or peace of mind when I think of the key motif. It’s nothing new in the jewelry world at all, but I rarely see actual keys used to adorn the necks or wrists of the accessory-minded crowd. There’s always an appeal of vintage items, and I always love anything that falls into the repurposing/DIY realm too (I can be a bit of a hoarder…every little thing I find I just must keep to make it into something, even though that really…rarely…ever happens. You know once you finally toss something, you finally find a use for it anyway, right?) that makes me feel just a little better about my footprint on the planet. But I love the symbolism of a key. La Clé Jewelry followed me on Twitter one day, and I instantly saw a great blog post. Deanna Saracino is the Canadian designer behind the company, using repurposed vintage keys for a variety of hand-painted or printed pieces to wear around your neck. La Clé asks, “What’s Your Color?”, prompting customers to choose a color that represents them from a menu of colors and their meanings, to proudly wear it as a reminder to embrace its “colorful meaning.” As the paint on your key jewelry wears off over time, it symbolizes the positive energy you’ve absorbed from the meaning of your chosen color.

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Steampunk Jewelry by Tangled Metal

Do I really need to say much here? I can’t even remember how I ran across this awesome Etsy shop, but I am certainly glad I did. How cool is this? If you’ve seen my blog for the last few months you know how much I love the individual artisans, and I love to support them! I think by now we are fairly familiar with the concept of “steampunk,” right? That is, a sub-genre of science fiction that involves 19th century or wild western steam-powered machinery. This historical fascination seems to kind of have a cult following, translating into clothing, conventions, movies…you name it, and I have no idea if it’s just popped up within the last few years or if it’s been an ongoing trend way before I became aware of it! Either way, I personally adore old fashion advertisements of all the crazy whimsical innovations that were cranked out in rapid succession (often without much thought towards them it seems) in order to fix all of the banes of everyday living. I find it both fascinating and comical and as someone in the print/design industry, I can’t help myself.

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Vintage Levis by RE/DUN

Vintage Levis by Re/Dun

Image: Re/Dun

Vintage Levis by Re/Dun

Even though I haven’t quite understood the appeal yet, vintage jeans are a huge conversation topic amongst denim fans everywhere. I never have taken the time to dig through flea markets and secondhand stores for jeans (although I have scored a few good finds on eBay), but I (like most) do understand the desire for that perfect, broken-in weekend jean. I’m just not quite sure I’d want a jean that someone else broke in…I’m more of an AG Jeans AG-Ed type of gal. However, the market and desire for vintage jeans is undeniably huge, and one duo found a smart way to tap into it, with great success.

RE/DUN launched on July 28 and is the work of Sean Barron and Jamie Mazur, who are both fashion entrepreneurs and big denim fans. In an interview with Fashionista.com, Mazur states “I’ve collected vintage Levi’s my entire life, since I first discovered them in my late teens. I love the washes on them, but I never really liked the way they fit because they were just wide-legged, non-flattering and high-waisted old jeans from the ’50s and ’60s. At a certain point I discovered these special denim tailors that you could take them to, and basically they’ll fit them to your body and make them fit like modern jeans.” Inspired by the originality and unique personalities of vintage jeans, Mazur and Barron started up RE/DUN with 50 pairs of jeans they hand-picked and had tailored from the bottom up: each jean was deconstructed by the seams and resewn into either a straight skinny or relaxed straight jean, which are the two styles available on their website. Each pair is priced in the $200 range and apparently, all sold out in the first 50 hours! There are several styles currently available but many are still sold out…this is solid proof that there was a definite niche waiting to be filled, and these guys knew it.

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The Tumbleweed Gets a Classy Upgrade

Same Tree

The Tumbleweed Gets a Classy Upgrade

“By taking the old and turning it into something innovative and new, it’s like I’m giving life to a piece of history. I never know when I’ll come across my next revival but I know it when I see it.”

My mother told me that when I was little, it would take a whole hour to take one lap around the block, because I had to stop at EVERYTHING I saw on the ground to either examine or collect. Now, I’m not too different (sometimes to the playful ire of my hubby). Take me to the beach and I’ll come home with a handful of pretty rocks. I love appreciating things around me…especially things that would otherwise be seen as junk…I remember in school re-purposing things I found around the schoolyard like pencils, pens, erasers, you name it (Lana, thy name is packrat). I’ve always admired nature, particularly deserts…so “dead,” and untouched, and open. The desert staple, the tumbleweed, is something that represents isolation, abandonment, and maybe even death, but I always kind of thought the image of a tumbleweed bounding across a desert represented life, albeit small, or hope amongst a “barren” landscape.

A Scoutmob newsletter alerted me to this awesome artist that struck me due to the above reasons. Same Tree is made up of Nicole, Robert, and Jayne Boles, who all believe in repurposing — taking otherwise unneeded items and recreating them into something special. Everything is made in the USA to support independent artisans, local manufacturing and small business too! Same Tree offers all sorts of artwork to add to your interior decor project. Check out this repurposed wood made into furniture! They also make all kinds of different lighting, and my focus in particular here is on one of them — these beautiful tumbleweed chandeliers as part of their Native collection. Look how alive they look! I love them…they make me want to have a special room in my house dedicated to the ruggedness of the outdoors.

All chandeliers can be purchased here!

Same Tree - Native Horizontal ChandelierSame Tree - Native Chandelier PetiteSame Tree - Native ChandelierSame Tree - Native Chandelier Classic